Tag Archives: computers

The Mystery of P.I.Y. (Printing It Yourself)

I have just purchased and successfully setup a printer for producing quality photographs.  To be honest I have been postponing this day simply due to my frustrating experience with I.T.  I began life with photography in the darkroom; so I am comfortable with the wet developing process but software and hardware compatibility leaves me cold through a working life of bitter experiences!  The prospect of having to struggle with printers, software and computers has not been a happy one for me in the past.  However, I have bitten the bullet and within a day I was successfully printing photos to send to my Tutor for assessment.

The tipping point in the decision to take the plunge was as a result of unsuccessfully getting my assignment two photos printed satisfactorily from a third-party.  On checking with my Tutor he was insistent that my prints should be consistent and of high quality.  I consulted my student forum for advice and one of my fellow students recommended the Canon PI7250 which is available for around £50.  At first I was annoyed with my Tutor; but on reflection realized he was right and I was being silly.  So I purchased a printer from Amazon on next working day delivery and had it running by late evening on the same day of delivery.  I am using a colour Spyder4 to calibrate my screen and I downloaded an up to date printer driver in order to be able to create a reliable printer profile for Lightroom and Photoshop.

I have set Photoshop and Lightroom for 300PPI and made sure the printer is set to high quality on slow output setting.

Exercise, Project 5, ‘The real and the digital’.

Does digital technology change how we see photography as truth?’

In the book Photography a Critical Introduction (4th edition), Edited by Liz Wells  and published by Routledge, it is agued that digital technology is challenging the concept of the ‘real’ in modern photography.  With the development of digital media technology it is now possible to construct convincingly realistic images on computers.  Photographic manipulation is not new, it’s been around from the very beginning but what is new is the extent of what is now possible which also co-insides with the loss of a hard original negative.  With the ability to construct an image from scratch Roland Barthes‘, excepted conception of the nature of the photograph, that it is the result of an event in the world, evidence of a passing moment of time that was once but no-more is now becoming harder to defend and perhaps a new formal conception must now be linked to the nature of the twenty-first century digital image.

Liberation, 1991, Jean Baudrillard wrote, ‘the Gulf war did not take place’.  He was making a comment on the nature of the ‘real’ his argument that the Gulf war was in fact a combination of political, social and military action acted out in a kind of social and technical space.  David Campany also comments that almost a third of news photographs are from frame grabs off video film footage.  The point being made is that photography is a medium that is not autonomous or self-governing but inter-related to other medias and is more influenced by culturally than technologically.

Without an autonomous and self-governing system there is a lack of rock solid unchangeable definitions in photography which are now beginning to challenge some of the existing definitions in photography. For example the photographic practice of documentary photography is changing and a sub-genre of photography is now well established in the USA calling itself, ‘wedding photojournalism’.