Tag Archives: face

Julie Cockburn

Julie Cockburn

I learned of this artist through a fellow student  on Facebook.  Cockburn appears to specialize in ‘found photographs’ that she embellishes with embroidery, etc. often to disguise or obliterate the face / identity of the person in the picture.  She has exhibited and sells her picture for large sums http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/juliecockburn.  Like the lady in the picture, I can say no more about this artist.

As artist we are a funny breed! I was recently told by an artist that most artists are Socialists and I often hear them talk about the evils of Capitalism and then I go and find that artist will find someone else’s old photos and scribble, scratch, embroider or simply add a title to alter their meaning and put them up for sale for large sums of money.  Seems to me without the evil Capitalist world we would be starving or more likely simply not doing art!

Salvador Dali was kicked out of the Surrealist movement for supporting Franco, perhaps his real crime was that he just couldn’t be hypercritical enough for his fellow contemporaries.

 

Working log-2 for Assignment Three – Sarah’s Character Assessment

Planning for my next assessment was for my wife’s character assessment of me.

Sarahs Character Statement

Taking extracts from her assessment I began to plan

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Sketching ideas I then tried putting them in to practice with a camera.  All but my last idea worked and talking it through with Sarah we came up with the idea of my hand locking a door to suggest the want for privacy.  I thought that by adding Sarah’s hand on top suggests both privacy and intimacy as well as keeping a consistency to my images by including her in the shot.

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D800e, 105mm f/2.8, 1/250, f/8, ISO-125, Tripod, Timer, WB-Auto, Remote flash, -3.0 EVA, 24mm zoom, I-TTL.

This next image was inspired by a lovely photo by Nan Goldin that she called ‘The Hug’, New York City 1980.  I first saw this on the front cover of a book, Singular Images, Essays on Remarkable Photographs, edited by Sophie Howarth, that I recently purchased second hand.  (This book is currently out of print.)

_DSC0792-Edit-resized  Singular Images

D800e, 24-120mm f/4, @86mm, 1/250, f/13, ISO-125, Tripod,Timer, WB-Auto, Remote flash, -3.0 EVA, 24mm zoom, I-TTL.

This last image is my hand wiping a tear from Sarah’s face.

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D800e, 55-300mm f/4.5-f/5.6 DX, @330mm (FX) 1/2o0, f/6.3, ISO-125, Tripod, Timer, WB-Auto, Remote flash -3.0 EVA, 24mm zoom, I-TTL.

I kept this image simple; so planning was not needed.

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D800e, 24-120mm f/4 @52mm, 1/320, f/5.6, ISO-320.

I the final presentation I only used.

 

 

 

Elina Brotherus


Photo by Elina Brotherus. This linked image is available to view on line at: http://www.paris-art.com

Elina Brotherus has used self-portraiture in some interesting and creative ways, I like this image of her reflection in the mirror held in front of the face of the model.  Brotherus has a good website illustrating a lot of her work.  Brotherus has also studied ideas of self-portraiture in connection with landscape and her environment and how they relate.

On Photography, Susan Sontag

On_Photography

Susan Sontag, On Photography, (1979) London, Penguin, ISBN: 978-0-14-005397-5.

This book by Susan Sontag is a collection of essays discussing how photography has influenced the world since its invention and how it has played a part in the surrealist art movement in the 20th Century.

The book was first published in 1977 and although photography has moved on she spends a lot of time discussing how photography was first introduced accepted or not and how it came to be the most enduring and influential part of the surrealist movement.  She also looks at how photographs are used and how they can be re-used.

Topics and points to note:

  • In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge out notion of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe.
  • Photos are a grammar and even more importantly, an ethics of seeing.
  • Photos give us the sense that we can hold the world in our hands.
  • In photographs the image is also an object.
  • As object they can be collected, bought & sold, cherished, thrown away, lost & found, etc, etc.
  • Photographs furnish evidence, they appear to provide proof when something is in doubt.
  • A photograph justifies, for example through use of surveillance and is a presumption of proof that something exists.
  • Photography has become almost as widely practiced an amusement as sex and dancing – which means that like all mass art form, photography is not practiced by people as an art.  It is mainly a social rite, a defence against anxiety and a tool of power.
  • Photographs can abet desire and emotions of morality.
  • The industrialisation of photography permitted its rapid absorption into bureaucratic ways of running society…photographs became part of the general furniture of the environment – touchstones and confirmations of that reductive approach to reality which is considered realistic.  Photographs were enrolled in the service of important institutions of control, notably the family and the police, as symbolic object and as pieces of information….many important documents are not valid unless they have affixed to them, a photographic-token of the citizen’s face.