Tag Archives: impression

Tutors report for assignment 4

shaun-mullins-512659-photography-1-context-narrative-assignment-4

I have just received my report from Clive for assignment 4 and I am very pleased to learn that my essay was a total success!

Interestingly, Clive recommends that I read, ‘The Trial’ by Kafka, an author that by coincidence I have just learned of through my reading of Walter Benjamin’s 1934 essay observing the tenth anniversary of Kafka death.

Clive’s final comment is some advise for my next assignment and he quotes:

“…..this is the one you’re going to be remembered by as the final assignment the assessors will see for this module so you want to make it the pinnacle of the work. Bringing everything you’ve learned from the other assignments to bear.

Use your ‘voice’ to express a sophisticated idea in a sophisticated way. Think of the thought that went into making the scene you chose for this assignment. I think you’ve got the skills and awareness to make something really good that will leave the assessors with a very strong impression of your abilities.”

No Pressure then!

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Exercise – Setting the scene

In this exercise I have been asked to watch a scene from the ‘Goodfeelas’ by Martin Scorsese.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJEEVtqXdK8

What does this scene tell me about the main character?

He is confident, very self-assured, he has money, at least he likes to give the impression that he has and willing to throw it around.  He wants to impress his girlfriend, he is a net-worker, he is a lair and probably a hood.

How does it do this? List the clues.

1, From the opening scene the main character gives his car keys with a Dollar bill to a doorman to park his car, he then proceeds to discreetly bribe his way to his table with Dollar bills that we later learn from his girlfriend to be $20 Dollar bills.  As he enters the club from the tradesman’s entrance  as he passes by key people he makes a point to greet them by name, some also with the bribe.  He walks through the corridors, kitchens as if he owns them, as he enters the club the manager breaks off from talking to a customer to greet him and treating him as a VIP arrange for a table for him brushing off a complaint from a customer who had clearly been waiting for a table.  The sound-track from 1960’s pop-band The Crystals, Then he kissed, me is played through out the scene to suggest romance.  When his girl friend asks him what he does, he provides an un-plausible answer that he needed a second or so provide and he avoids eye-contact.  He is given a bottle of wine from another table full of suited men implying that the main character is popular and important.

 

 

Exercise-Project-3-Self-absented Portraiture


Photo by Nigel Shafran, Titled, 4th January 2004. Three bean soup, cauliflower vegetable cheese. Morning coffee and croissants. From the series Washing-up. Available to view online: http://nigelshafran.com

This image has a tell-tale clue that this is a man’s washing-up from the drying paint-brush hanging over the sink.  It doesn’t surprise me that these photos are taken by a man; but the choice of subject matter does.  I am sure many married men (I being one) often do the washing up.  My father often washes up for my mother but he often does such a poor job of it needs cleaning again.  Thankfully I don’t follow in this tradition.

I would agree with the opinion that gender does contribute to a the creation on an image.  for the reasons that certain issues will have more of a personal interest to one gender than the other for example – various feminine social, private and public politics; sexuality; male and female health issues to mention just a few.

These images have been composed without including people in the frame.  The angles and vantage points of the camera puts the viewer at normal head height relative to the subject matter.  This gives the impression to me of putting the viewer in to the picture; so that this not only can represent the artists daily chores but also offering up the chore to the viewer to do.

As a still-life the concept of putting the viewer in to the picture I do find interesting but these images as they stand as photos of washing-up, I wouldn’t spend much time in a gallery scrutinizing.  Has these images been carefully arranged?  Perhaps, perhaps not.